Who is Marilyn Brown?

More than sixty years ago, Marilyn Brown perceived that the MORMON EXPERIENCE was misrepresented or not represented at all in American Literature. As time went on, the best "Mormon" writers blossomed in science fiction, fantasy, or young adult genres. But Brown has always believed there would someday be an interest in what really happened in the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, what happens in the ethno-centric families of today, and what actual struggles, sorrows, and joys make people in her part of the country exactly like hopeful people everywhere.

Marilyn has published many novels, short stories, poems, and even stage musicals, among which include:

. . . and much more . . .

What's New

The Rosefields of Zion

Rosefields of Zion Book Front Cover

Marilyn Brown's new novel THE ROSEFIELDS OF ZION is a lyrical review of some of the history of Zion National Park, including an engrossing fictional romance and a riveting mystery fraught with dangers of greed, deception and murder.

Marissa Rosefield has four brothers. Her favorite is Michael who play duets with her for their parents' funerals After the parents are gone, the question arises as to the title of the farm. The government wants to buy the farm for the visitor center. It is true that the historic family did not want to sell this piece, but were finally encouraged to do so. The fiction is that Marissa is sent to the courthouse to deal with the government and falls in love with the title recorder. Murder and intrigue follow. See Amazon for reviews!

Fires of Jerusalem

Fires of Jerusalem Cover

The siege of Jerusalem by the Assyrian and Babylonian armies in 586 B.C. created devastation and despair. . . especially for Jeremiah and Lehi, who tried to tell the people what was coming if they did not turn their lives around. This Old Testament story is intriguingly told in Marilyn Brown's latest novel.

“Jeremiah’s name is synonymous with a tirade, a long list of evils and social ills. Marilyn Brown captures this all in three words: “Jerusalem was broken.” From that opening sentence Marilyn goes on to give a six-decade portrait of Jeremiah from his first vision at fourteen years old to his hiding sacred artifacts in a hill to his flight from Jerusalem and hiding sacred records in a barrel. In between we see a portrait of Jeremiah as a sometimes reluctant prophet living among dangerous people, and among other prophets, Lehi, Ezekiel, Daniel, Jehu, Zephaniah, Nahum, his Aunt Huldah, the prophetess, and his father Hilkiah, who discovers the lost record of Moses. We see him descending into the valley of the shadow, into the miry pit. We wait for every writer’s nightmare, to watch precious work burn page by page. But Jeremiah comes out of the pit, out of the shadow, and out of the fire come his words.”

Harlow Clark
Literary Critic, Dawning of a Brighter Day


Now available in Paperback or Kindle Edition at Amazon.com


Images of America: Provo

Images of America: Provo cover

A fascinating history of scenes in Provo's past was recently published in June, 2011, by the national Arcadia Publishing Company. With Valerie Holladay's help, Marilyn has put together more than two hundred pictures of Provo, beginning with her painting of Etienne Proveau. The volume includes a recent photograph of Provo's tabernacle ravaged by fire.

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Responses to Marilyn Brown's Works

"After hearing many sing their praises of Brown's skill as an author, I finally read one of her books myself, House on the Sound. And sure enough, she is a talented wordsmith: the dialogue all rings true, the descriptions shimmer with life, the characters are fully realized."
-Andrew R. Hall
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"I hope you decide to read this book (House on the Sound). It is written with a subtle elegance that is deceiving."
-Jeffrey Needle
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"I'm glad I read The Wine-Dark Sea of Grass. . . . This is a novel [that seeks] ideals set against a historical backdrop, and I believe the novel succeeds quite well on those terms."
-Scott Parkin
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"Ghosts of the Oquirrhs is not so much a tale of darkess, but rather a dark comedy, a spooky morality tale that kept me reading into the night. . . . The symbolism is powerfully crafted. . . ."
-Jeffrey Needle
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For more reviews visit mormonletters.org