FICTION

House on the Sound

House on the Sound Cover

The threat of World War II was a reality with Marilyn's family, as they lived on the west coast when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. This story tells of her experience, both with the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and of her father, who spent nights as a watchman on the very ships that were destroyed. As a child, Marilyn was symbolically threatened by their own neighbors who were hostile to America and the American way of life.
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"Mesmeriszing. A hauntingly beautiful story. Brown's richly textured prose style is reminiscent of Eudora Welty's-lyrical, sensuous, evocative. House on the Sound is a literary triumph!"
Sharlee Mullins Glenn
Author of Circle Dance and other works
"Marilyn Brown has given us her best work in this memoir-novel of childhood on Puget Sound from 1940 to 1944. A good read-funny, scary, lyrical. With memorable characters . . . my favorite is Grandfather McKinsey."
Bruce W. Jorgensen
Literary Critic contributing to Irreantum, Dialogue and others. Professor of English, BYU
"House on the Sound uses the legends and archetypes of danger in the woods to give us a child's view of two families making war in different ways."
Harlow Clark
Literary Critic, Dawning of a Brighter Day
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Ghosts of the Oquirrhs

Ghosts of the Oquirrhs Cover

The story of the demise of Mercur, a prominent gold-mining town in the Oquirrh Mountains of Utah, is a quirky dark comedy representing Brown's best literary efforts.
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". . . a highly original and fascinating story. In Cecily McKinsey and charismatic Brooker Rose, Brown has created her finest and most fully realized characters. Ghosts of the Oquirrhs establishes her securely among the top Rocky Mountain writers of fiction."
Richard Cracroft
Book Columnist, BYU Magazine
"No one spins a better tale than Marilyn Brown, and few writers have her gift for mining the past and bringing to life some of its deeply buried treasures . . . in language that simultaneously engages and delights."
Marilyn Arnold
Author of acclaimed memoir, Bittersweet
"Perhaps what I enjoyed most was Marilyn's beautiful gift of language. The poet is ever evident, but not obtrusive. One of the finest examples of historical fiction from Utah that has been written in recent years."
Sally Taylor
Poet, Professor of English at BYU
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The Earthkeepers

Earthkeepers Cover

This is Brown's first published novel. After writing the exciting story of the Provo pioneers for Provo: A Story of People in Motion, Marilyn wrote this 500 page novel, which won the first novel award ever given by The Association for Mormon Letters. Inventing the Eastmans and their young daughter Mara, who is in love with the missionary Brett Hunt, Brown places them as first settlers in a harsh land threatened by Indian battles and crop failures. It became the basis for a series of books published by Covenant Communications. After The Earthkeepers was published, Covenant Communications divided the large book into two parts Thorns of the Sun and Shadows of Angels, and Marilyn wrote a third book, Royal House, to continue the story of Mara and her Indian child as the city became a larger metropolis.
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The Earthkeeper Series

Thorns of the Sun

Thorns of the Sun Cover

The man who was about to rape Mara forces the beautiful Indian maiden Blueflower to be his wife. Blueflower dies in childbirth. No one knows who the father of the baby Sobe is, but Mara takes care of him during the trying times of the Indian wars, the crop failures, and the building of Provo.
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Shadows of Angels

Shadows of Angels Cover

Mara falls in love with one of the soldiers who comes through to establish Camp Floyd when the U.S. army—finding the city packed with straw, ready to be burned—left it alone. However, the army established Camp Floyd near to Provo and used that city for carousing, drinking, and causing trouble. Eventually a fire destroyed the mill where Sobe worked.
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Royal House

Royal House Cover

Sobe is confused by his Indian heritage, and Mara's love and attention is not enough to plunge him into despair when he cannot marry the girl he loves because her parents are against a racial marriage. He is a hard worker and a good man. Mara "carries" him on her shoulders as much as she can to help the Indian people.
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The Wine-Dark Sea of Grass

Wine-Dark Sea of Grass Cover

One of the most fascinating stories of Utah history is the Mountain Meadows Massacre. Although other books have explored it, Marilyn's John D. Lee is one of the most penetrating, and complete character sketches yet compiled. The story, riveting and logical, rings true.
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"Well-crafted novel . . . may be among those few works of Mormon fiction we call 'classic'. . ."
Richard Cracroft
Book Columnist, Brigham Young Magazine
"A very sensitive subject handled well. I'm impressed."
Douglas Thayer
Author of Summer Fire
". . . best novel about the Mountain Meadows Massacre."
Lavina Fielding Anderson
Editor for Association of Mormon Letters
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Light in the Room

Light in the Room Cover Goodbye Hello Cover

First published by Randall Book as Good-bye, Hello, this story comes from an actual experience that happened in Marilyn's brother-in-law Lawrence Flake's family. A pioneer girl in awe of her older sister's courtship, Trissy is aware of her family's dislike of this disreputable young man. However, when she grows old and can barely see, she has a vision of him. A poignant story about love, romance, and repentance, it was such a favorite that CFI reprinted it under the new title.
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Statehood

Statehood Cover

This novel, published by Aspen Book, is the story of how difficult it was for statehood to be offered to the territory of Deseret because of their life-style of polygamy. The historical details of the struggle are told as well as the perilous anti-polygamous raids of destruction.
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Serpent in Paradise

Serpent in Paradise Cover

Richard Dutcher, famous film maker of God's Army, approached Marilyn to write a sequel to his acclaimed movie, Brigham City, the story of a sheriff in a small Utah town who must track down a serial killer. Instead of a sequel, Marilyn wrote a pre-quel, adding to the front of the story some of the psychological and pathological reasons for the killer's actions.
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"Wonderful work! A fascinating expansion of Brigham City."
Richard Dutcher
Filmmaker
"[Marilyn] invites us to revisit the town and people of Richard Dutcher's find film Brigham City, and to ponder anew the entanglement of light and darkness, the tragic and sacramental risks and deeds, in our efforts to gather and live together to make and sustain and shelter families and communities."
Bruce W. Jorgensen
Literary Critic contributing to Irreantum, Dialogue and others. Professor of English, BYU
"Like Thomas Harri's Francis Dolarhyde in Red Dragon, Terry is a wounded soul who wants to fit in but can only kill. Where Thomas Harris gives us the grand tour of depravity, Marilyn Brown gives us a picture of two wounded people in paradise moving in a dance of death as spare and stylized as a Greek tragedy."
Harlow Clark
Literary Critic for the Deseret News, Dawning of a Brighter Day.
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Fires of Jerusalem

Fires of Jerusalem Cover

The siege of Jerusalem by the Assyrian and Babylonian armies in 586 B.C. created devastation and despair. . . especially for Jeremiah and Lehi, who tried to tell the people what was coming if they did not turn their lives around. This Old Testament story, intriguingly told in Marilyn Brown's latest novel, will be published in 2011.

"Jeremiah's name is synonymous with a long list of evils and social ills. Marilyn Brown captures this all in three words: "Jerusalem was broken." From that opening sentence Marilyn goes on to give a six-decade portrait of Jeremiah from his first vision at fourteen years old to his hiding sacred artifacts in a hill to his flight from Jerusalem and hiding sacred records in a barrel. In between we see a portrait of Jeremiah as a sometimes reluctant prophet living among dangerous people, and among other prophets, Lehi, Ezekiel, Daniel, Jehu, Zephaniah, Nahum, his Aunt Huldah, the prophetess, and his father Hilkiah, who discovers the lost record of Moses. We see him descending into the valley of the shadow, into the miry pit. We wait for every writer's nightmare, to watch precious work burn page by page. But Jeremiah comes out of the pit, out of the shadow, and out of the fire come his words."

Harlow Clark
Literary Critic, Dawning of a Brighter Day

Now available in Paperback or Kindle Edition at Amazon.com

"Marilyn Brown is one of the stalwarts of our ethnocentric fiction, bringing zest, imagination, subtlety and shimmering prose to a genre dominated by cliché. The Fires of Jerusalem is a thoroughly-researched, soul-expanding work which both tells a cracking yarn, and forces the reader to explore the meaning of Bible passages which too often we blithely glide by."
Andrew R. Hall
Associate Professor of History, Kyushu University, Japan
"I wasn't sure anyone could make an Old Testament prophet, especially one as dour and dishwater dull as Jeremiah, accessible to readers, let alone appealing. Marilyn Brown accomplishes both in Fires of Jerusalem. The thing I like best about this engaging book is how well Brown has done her homework; for all her narrative expansion and psychological imagination, she's remarkably true to the Biblical text of Jeremiah. And I liked almost as much how thoroughly I was caught up in the drama, captivated by the action of the novel, from the first page."
Steven Walker
Professor of English: Bible as Literature, BYU
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